Posts Tagged coconut palm sugar

Chocolate Fudge Bundt Cake

This month there has been more excitement and much less blogging, but still cooking, baking and thinking about nutritious, delicious, gluten-free food. And a recipe for a dark, rich chocolate cake – I thought about that a lot :-)

Super Chocolate Fudge Cake

Super Chocolate Fudge Cake

Some of the excitement:
#1 Son came for a visit – Mom {me} was thrilled and Don and I both cooked up a storm.

Granddaughter Megan is graduating this month, I’ve been doing sewing and alterations for post-college wardrobe. The graduation celebration and Christmas gift exchange are being combined to reduce family holiday travel.

Rita is moving back to Texas mid-month and staying with us until she locates a new apartment. I had to finish the sewing, get it delivered to Megan, and put away the sewing machine and ironing board.

My sibs and I are selling some of our Grandpa’s farm property – much nostalgia involved and so far, over 100 emails. It is amazing that we will be able to complete this with two of us physically present at closing and the other two mailing and/or emailing the required documents.

Don and I spent some time cutting back shrubs in preparation for the exterior of our house to be painted. It was scratchy, itchy, tedious work. We did it ourselves because we wanted it done our way.

Freshly Painted Plant Stand

Freshly Painted Plant Stand

My tall metal plant stand for the front porch needed painting. I placed it out in the yard, away from the house, so the paint spray would be carried away by the breeze. Almost as soon as I completed spraying the stand was caught in the middle of a mass ballooning baby spider migration.  Many of the spiders and their silk strands landed on the plant stand. Fortunately they were so tiny and the paint had dried so quickly that none of them became part of the finish.

Finally I had time to think and plan and was able to put together a modification of the Pumpkin Bundt Cake  to create this Chocolate Fudge Bundt Cake. This creation was intended to just be a dark, intensely chocolate cake. It came out so moist that I kept apologizing for it while everyone was saying ‘moist is good!’ Finally I stopped apologizing. It tastes like a blend of cake and fudge. I may tweak it but maybe not. Since it is so good I wanted to go ahead and share it. You will see from the ingredient list that it is not going to send you into sugar shock unless you are way more sensitive than I am. And since it is grain-free it does not trigger me to keep eating more and more – thank you to the dark lords of the chocolate underworld!

Chocolate Fudge Cake - Up Close

Chocolate Fudge Cake – Up Close

Wet Ingredients:
1/4 cup coconut oil, unrefined
1 cup pumpkin
1 square unsweetened chocolate
3/4 cup full-fat coconut milk
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Dry Ingredients:
1/4 cup coconut palm sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons chia seed
1/4 cup Truvia
1/4 cup tapioca flour
1/4 cup cocoa powder {update 12-11-2012}
2 tablespoons coconut flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup (112g) almond flour
Optional: but highly recommended :-)
1/2 cup mini-chocolate chips

1. Set the oven at 325*F – gluten-free bakes better at lower temperatures and a little longer than gluten baked goods. Oil your pan(s) using a pastry brush and coconut oil. Alternately use a 7” Bundt pan, 12 cupcake molds, or 2 mini-loaf pans. Set aside.
2. Melt the coconut oil and the unsweetened chocolate together; allow to cool. Grind the coconut palm sugar and chia seed to powder. For sugar-free, substitute the sugar with more Truvia. You can use all Lakanto or your preferred baking sweetener. Measure chocolate chips and set aside.
3. Measure and sift together the dry ingredients, except almond flour, into a large bowl. Add the almond flour without sifting. It will not pass through a sieve.
4. In a medium bowl, whisk together pumpkin, the cooled chocolate and oil, coconut milk, vanilla, and vinegar until blended.
5. Fold the pumpkin mixture into the dry ingredients. Continue folding just until the mixture comes together. Quickly stir in the chocolate chips. When using soda and vinegar for leavening it is essential to get the cake in the oven quickly.
6. Pour the batter into prepared pan(s). Smooth the top with a spatula.
7. For the small 7” Bundt bake for about 40 minutes and turn the heat off for 5 more minutes. Bake about 25 minutes total for cupcakes or muffin tops, and about 25-30 minutes for small loaf pans.
8. Cool the cake in the pan for 5-10 minutes.
9. Remove from pan and move to a wire rack to finish cooling.

Choosing the ingredients:
I used canned pumpkin and have used it for years. It is one of my preferred pantry staples. I recently tried an organic brand but the consistancy is different. We will eventually become accustomed to it.

Unrefined organic coconut oil has a sweet note to enhance the sweetness of the cake without adding coconut flavor. Refined will work just as well.

You may use full-fat or light coconut milk. You may also dilute full-fat coconut milk half-&-half with unsweetened almond milk.

Coconut palm sugar tends to be very coarse. I grind it in a coffee bean grinder along with the chia seed so that both will dissolve and distribute better in the batter.

I use Bob’s Red Mill brand for the tapioca and coconut flours. Honeyville blanched (ordered online) is my choice for almond flour. Bob’s would probably work just as well but I don’t know for sure.

I hope others enjoy this just as much as we do!

Gretchen @gfedge

This post is linked to:
Wellness Weekend December 6-10, 2012
at Ricki Heller’s Blog – Diet, Dessert, and Dogs

Comments (1)

Pumpkin Bundt Cake – A Long Journey

I have been distracted lately – probably for the last two years. So many things are going on that I constantly lose focus. When I do snap back I usually end up starting on something else and then lose focus on that. Now that it is pumpkin season again I am picking up on a thought that started about a year-and-a-half ago ;-)

I first found Karoline’s original recipe for Pumpkin Bundt Cake  in May of 2011 and wanted to make it gluten-free. The original recipe called for barley flour. Barley gluten is said to be different from wheat gluten but it is closely related as are several other grass grains. I have made many modifications to both the recipe and my baking objectives since then.

Initially this was a vegan recipe and one that I wanted to remain vegan. Being torn between paleo and vegan makes for a split personality in my recipe box but for the moment that’s where it’s at. In the meantime there are several other objectives driving the modifications with one of my current objectives being low glycemic load.

I first eliminated all of the grass (Poaceae) family of plants plus most of the seeds of plants except for the ones I grind up and use as egg replacers: flax, chia, and psyllium seeds. Experiments with agave and other sweeteners such as xylitol have led me to my personal tolerance/preference for erythritol, stevia, and coconut palm sugar. Then I eliminated dairy and substituted coconut products for their nutritional and healing properties; coconut oil, coconut flour, and coconut milk. Occasionally I use tapioca or potato starch in small amounts for texture and browning qualities.

Half recipe - 7-inch Bundt Cake

Half recipe – 7-inch Bundt Cake

5.0 from 1 reviews
Pumpkin Bundt Cake
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert, breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 14-16
 
A dense pumpkin cake made from nutritious, low-carb flours and filled with fruit and toasted nuts.
Ingredients
  • Full Recipe for a 10 inch Bundt Cake
  • 1½ cups walnuts, chopped
  • ½ cup coconut oil, unrefined
  • 1½ cups pumpkin
  • ½ cup Truvia
  • 1½ cups coconut milk
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 4 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup golden raisins
  • Dry Ingredients:
  • ½ cup coconut palm sugar
  • 1½ cups almond flour
  • 1 cup tapioca flour
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • 1 tablespoon ground chia
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 2 teaspoons ground allspice
  • 2 teaspoons ground cloves
  • 2 teaspoons grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Half Recipe for a 7 inch Bundt Cake
  • ¾ cup walnuts, chopped
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, unrefined
  • 1 cup pumpkin
  • ¼ cup Truvia
  • ¾ cup coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup + 2 T. golden raisins
  • Dry Ingredients:
  • ¼ cup coconut palm sugar
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1½ teaspoons ground chia
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Set the oven at 325*F – gluten-free bakes better at lower temperatures and a little longer than gluten baked goods. Oil your pan(s) using a pastry brush and coconut oil. Then dust very lightly with tapioca flour. Alternately use 48 cupcake molds or 4 mini-loaf pans. Set aside.
  2. Sauté the nuts in a small skillet in the coconut oil. Set aside to cool.
  3. Measure and sift together the dry ingredients into a large bowl.
  4. In a medium bowl, whisk together pumpkin, the cooled oil and nuts, raisins, milk, vanilla, and vinegar.
  5. Fold the pumpkin mixture into the dry ingredients. Continue folding just until the mixture comes together. When using soda and vinegar for leavening it is essential to get the cake in the oven quickly.
  6. Pour batter into prepared pan(s). Smooth the top with a spatula.
  7. Bake for 50-60 minutes for full size Bundt, rotating the cake from front to back after 20 minutes, about 25 minutes total for cupcakes or muffin tops, and about 25-30 minutes for small loaf pans.
  8. For the small Bundt bake for about 40 minutes and turn the heat off for the last 5 minutes.
  9. Cool the large cake in the pan for 15 minutes, the smaller items for less.
  10. Move to a wire rack to finish cooling.
Notes
Any of your favorite tender nuts are suitable – for appearance and texture the pieces should be easy to chew. Toasting in the skillet enhances the flavor in the finished cake. Dried cranberries, currants, chopped figs, dates, cherries, or apricots would all be nice; a mixture would make for a festive holiday fruitcake. Unrefined coconut oil has a sweet note to enhance the sweetness of the cake without a coconut flavor. Refined will work just as well. Full fat coconut milk may make the cake a little heavy. I used light coconut milk because it was in the pantry. Otherwise I would dilute full-fat coconut milk half-and-half with unsweetened almond milk. Coconut palm sugar tends to be very coarse. I grind it in the coffee bean grinder along with the chia seed so that it will dissolve and distribute better in the batter. The measure of spices should be adjusted to your taste and tolerance. For instance, although I love clove I cannot tolerate as much as my taste buds prefer so I reduce the amount.

I use Bob’s Red Mill brand for the tapioca and coconut flours. Honeyville blanched (ordered online) is my choice for almond flour. Bob’s would probably work just as well but I don’t know for sure.

My neighbors, Barb and Frank, agreed to taste test this recipe for me. I have their permission to share the comments they sent me:

Last night we sliced up your pumpkin cake and Frank said, “this is not bad.” Then he took another bite and finished it. Then he said, “this is really good. Can I have another slice.” So we both give it a thumbs up and we really thought it tasted very, very good. Keep up the good work!!!

I hope others enjoy this treat just as much!

This post is linked to:
Wellness Weekend November 1-5, 2012
at Ricki Heller’s Blog – Diet, Dessert, and Dogs

Gretchen @gfedge

Comments (5)

Hasselback Potatoes

These Hasselback Potatoes from Sweden remind me of an armadillo yet at the same time they are so elegant and ready to party. How can that be? Someone else thought they resembled an accordion so in Ireland they are known as Accordion Potatoes.

What they really are is delicious – very tender and well-seasoned with numerous topping variations. But truth be told, they are time-consuming to prepare which is not normally my style.

Maybe if I had a specialized Swedish Hasselback Potato Cutting Board it would go faster. Or if I had significantly better upper body strength; or eye/hand coordination – but it worked out with just a regular cutting board and being ve-e-e-ry careful not to cut all the way through the base of the potato.

The white potato version is the original recipe. After I tried it I found the sweet potato version  and I had to try that one also.

His (upper) and Hers (lower) Hassellback Potatoes

His (upper) and Hers (lower) Hassellback Potatoes

For the white potato version I used mostly olive oil, sea salt, garlic powder, and some almond meal mixed together as stuffing for my potato. Don’s potato was made with butter, grated parmesan cheese, sea salt, and pepper. Trying to get ‘stuffing’ of any description down those narrow little slits was challenging and getting it to stick on top was not easy either.

Hassellback Sweet Potato

Hassellback Sweet Potato

I’m the only sweet potato lover in the house so I chose to go completely off track from the published recipe using unrefined coconut oil, coconut palm sugar mixed with cinnamon, and stuffing bits of cranberry in the slits. It was yummy and I totally enjoyed it. There was a crisis getting the sweet potato photograph. My camera battery shut down just as I was trying to take the picture. I plugged it in to recharge but it would not take a picture while charging which takes a few hours – and I wanted to eat that sweet potato NOW, STAT. Don to the rescue using his cell phone camera. He had to load some software to transfer it to his computer but he is the household tech support guy and he had it done in no time. Then I polished off that potato!

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes
Ingredients per potato:
1 medium size sweet potato – should have a flat side and be even as possible front to back (some are really gnarly)
1 tablespoon unrefined coconut oil, warm and melted (available in Central Texas at HEB)
2 tablespoon dried cranberries (about)
1 tablespoon of coconut palm sugar (available in Central Texas at HEB)
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Maple syrup (agave if you prefer, light or dark)

Scrub the sweet potatoes and dry them. Set the oven to 375*F. Mix the sugar and cinnamon together and set aside.  Cut the potatoes crossways into thin (about 1/4 inch) slices leaving about a 1/2 inch base.

Brush the potato all over and into the crevices with the melted coconut oil. Flatten the cranberries and cut the larger ones in half so you can get the bits into the crevices. This might unbalance a potato so that it rolls to one side. Counter this by tucking additional cranberries on the other side to balance it back again.

Add the sugar-cinnamon mixture with a spoon making use of the spaces opened up by the cranberries to get it inside the potato. Drizzle with about 1 teaspoon of the maple syrup.

Set on a baking dish or sheet and cover with foil. Bake for about 30 minutes. Uncover and test with a thin knife to see if it is done. Since potatoes, especially sweet potatoes, vary so greatly in size the cooking time will vary as well. Re-cover and bake until tender and done to your liking.
Drizzle with just a bit more maple syrup to serve!

When thinking about making these again I am torn. Do I want to buy the inexpensive little cutting board to make these easier or do I want to simplify and cut the potatoes into thick slices lengthwise, place on a baking sheet, and pile the ‘stuffing’ on a nice flat, level surface? Time will tell.

In the meantime this was a fun and tasty look back in history.

This post is linked to:
Wellness Weekend January 19-23, 2011
at Ricki Heller’s Blog – Diet, Dessert, and Dogs.

Gretchen (and tech support, Don)

 

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